• 02 NOV 17
    • 0

    HSRAANZ Best Health Services and Policy Research Papers

    Congratulations to the winners of the HSRAANZ Best Paper Awards which were presented at our conference welcome reception last night.

    Best overall Paper

    The Best Paper award was made to Jing Jing He for her paper “Improving patient flow and satisfaction: An evidence-based pre-admission clinic and transfer of care pathway for elective surgery patients”

    He, J., et al. Improving patient flow and satisfaction: An evidence-based pre-admission clinic and
    transfer of care pathway for elective surgery patients. Collegian (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2017.04.006

    Bio: Jing Jing He is a research nurse at Macquarie University Hospital and a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney.  Jing graduated with First Class Honours in Nursing from the University of Sydney.  As a nurse, Jing has worked in various specialties include day surgery, cardiology, community nursing and clinical trials.  In 2014, she was appointed by Macquarie University Hospital as the research coordinator for the Pre-Admission Clinic Project (funded by the HCF Research Foundation). She has successfully led the project and implemented a triage system and discharge pathway for elective surgery patients.  Jing has a particular interest in clinical health innovations and using advanced technologies to improve patient outcome and practice efficiency.  Her PhD study focuses on the impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and a scalp cooling device on adult oncology patients.

    Jing Jing He receiving her award from HSRAANZ VPLaura Wilkinson-Meyers

    Abstract

    Aims: To redesign, implement and evaluate a Pre-Admission Clinic incorporated with a Transfer of Care Pathway for elective surgery patients.

    Methods: An evidence-based approach was used to redesign the Pre-Admission Clinic and the Transfer of Care Pathway. The impact of the pre-admission clinic and the care pathway was evaluated. De-identified data containing patient outcomes was collected from the hospital electronic medical record system from May 2014 to March 2015. Outcome measures included surgical cancellations, last-minute can-cellations, average length of stay, discharge delays, and adverse events that were compared pre and post-implementation. Patient satisfaction was measured pre and post-implementation by using a mod-ified version of Best Practice hospital survey.

    Results: A total of 10,854 eligible cases were included (5716 in the pre-implementation period and 5138 in the post-implementation period). The overall cancellation rate remained relatively stable (p = 0.95), however, the last-minute cancellation rate was reduced post-implementation (p = 0.02). Although no difference was observed in average length of stay (p = 0.39), the percentage of discharge delays was reduced (p = 0.027). The incidence of adverse events was too low to draw statistical conclusion. A sample of 102 patients completed the patient satisfaction survey. The overall satisfaction improved post-implementation (p = 0.03).

    Conclusions: The evidence-based Pre-Admission Clinic and the Transfer of Care Pathway had a positive impact on last-minute surgical cancellations, discharge delays and patient satisfaction.

    Best ECR Paper

    The Best Paper by an early career researcher was presented to Dr Erin Penno for her paper “The role, costs and value for money of external consultancies in the health sector: A study of New Zealand’s District Health Boards”

    Penno E, Gauld R. The role, costs and value for money of external
    consultancies in the health sector: A study of New Zealand’s District Health Boards. Health Policy (2017),
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.02.005

    Erin Penno

    Bio: Following a background working in the health sector in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand, Erin recently completed a PhD in public health at the University of Otago. She is currently a Research Fellow in the Dean’s Office in the Otago Business School where her research focuses on health funding, policy and systems.

    Abstract

    This paper examines spending on external consultancies in each of New Zealand’s 20 District Health Boards (DHB). Using evidence obtained from DHBs, it provides an insight into the cost and activities of consultants within the New Zealand health sector, the policies behind their engagement and the processes in place to ensure value for money. It finds that DHB spending on external consultants is substantial, at $NZ10–60 million annually. However, few DHBs had policies governing when consultants should be engaged and many were unable to easily identify the extent or purpose of consultancies within their organisation, making it difficult to derive an accurate picture of consultant activity throughout the DHB sector. Policies surrounding value for money were uncommon and, where present, were rarely applied. Given the large sums being spent by New Zealand’s DHBs, and assuming expenditure is similar in othe r health systems, the findings point to the need for greater accountability for expenditure and better evidence of value for money of consultancies within publicly funded health systems.

     

    Best Paper by a PhD Student

    This award was made to Ms Priya Martin for her paper “Factors influencing the perceived quality of clinical supervision of occupational therapists in a large Australian state” 

    Martin, P., Kumar, S., Lizarondo, L. and Tyack, Z. (2016), Factors influencing the perceived quality of clinical supervision of occupational therapists in a large Australian state. Aust Occup Ther J, 63: 338–346. doi:10.1111/1440-1630.12314 Link

    Priya Martin receiving her award from HSRAANZ VP Laura Wilkinson-Meyers

    Bio: Priya is an occupational therapist who has worked in a number of clinical, teaching, training and research roles in Australia and overseas. She currently works as a research officer with the Queensland Rural Generalist Pathway in Toowoomba, Queensland. She is also a PhD candidate with the University of South Australia. Her PhD research investigates the factors that contribute to high quality clinical supervision in allied health. She has expertise in interprofessional education, health professional education and training, curriculum development, mixed methods research designs and rural and remote workforce issues. She is increasingly being recognised as an international leader in the research and practice of clinical supervision.

    Abstract

    Background/aim: Clinical supervision is important for effective health service delivery, professional development and practice. Despite its importance there is a lack of evidence regarding the factors that improve its quality. This study aimed to investigate the factors that influence the quality of linical supervision of occupational therapists employed in a large public sector health service covering mental health, paediatrics, adult physical and other practice areas.

    Methods: A mixed method, sequential explanatory study design was used consisting of two phases. This article reports the quantitative phase (Phase One) which involved administration of the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) to 207 occupational therapists.

    Results: Frequency of supervision sessions, choice of super- visor and the type of supervision were found to be the predictor variables with a positive and significant influence on the quality of clinical supervision. Factors such as age, length of supervision and the area of practice were found to be the predictor variables with a negative and significant influence on the quality of clinical supervision.

    Conclusion: Factors that influence the perceived quality of clinical supervision among occupational therapists have been identified. High quality clinical supervision is an important component of clinical governance and has been shown to be beneficial to practitioners, patients and the organisation. Information on factors that make clinical supervision effective identified in this study can be added to existing supervision training and practices to improve the quality of clinical supervision.

    We will be featuring more on our winning papers and authors over the next few weeks.

     

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