• 12 DEC 19
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    A/Professor Rachael Morton – Distinguished Investigator (Mid-Career)

    This year’s award for the Mid-Career Distinguished Investigator was presented at the closing ceremony of our 11th Biennial Conference to Associate Professor Rachael Morton MScClinEpi(Hons), PhD, Director Health Economics, NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney.    Rachael is an academic health economist and methodologist, whose research spans many clinical areas. On completing her PhD in 2011 A/Professor  Morton won an NHMRC Sidney Sax Overseas Fellowship (2013-2016) to the University of Oxford. She returned to Sydney in August 2015, as Principal Research Fellow and Director of Health Economics, building a new team of 16 Health Services Researchers at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre. In 2017 she was awarded an NHMRC TRIP Fellowship and in 2018 a prestigious Robinson Fellowship (2019-2022). A/Prof Morton demonstrates an exceptional trajectory in research outputs and translation for her stage of career; and outstanding teaching, governance, and leadership in Health Services Research.

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    • 12 DEC 19
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    Professor Marion Haas – 2019 Distinguished Investigator (Life-Time Achievement)

    This year’s HSRAANZ Distinguished Investigator (Life-time achievement) Award was presented during the welcome reception of our 11th Health Research and Policy Conference in Auckland. The recipient, Professor Marion Haas is a Professor of Health Economics at the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation at the University of Technology Sydney. Over her career Marion has published 120 papers and attracted more than $40 million dollars in research funding. In addition to her enormous contribution to improving cancer screening, cancer clinical trials, patient experiences of health care and understanding the preferences and behaviour of providers and patients Professor Haas is recognised for her outstanding commitment to staff and student mentoring both within her school and more broadly. Professor Haas is well known for excellence in development of early and mid-career researchers in health services research and health economics. She is also recognised for her commitment and contribution to the success of the HSRAANZ, as one of its founding members, and serving subsequently as secretary and vice-president .

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    • 12 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ Awards 2019 – Winner Best Overall Quantitative Paper – Sue Kildea

    Professor Sue Kildea from Charles Darwin University, Queensland has won the HSRAANZ award for the best Quantitative Paper for her work “Reducing preterm birth amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies: A prospective cohort study, Brisbane, Australia”. The study compared outcomes for women with an Indigenous baby receiving care through a new service (n = 461) to women receiving standard care (n = 563), January 2013–December 2017. The study concluded that short-term results of this service redesign send a strong signal that the preterm birth gap can be reduced through targeted interventions that increase Indigenous governance of, and workforce in, maternity services and provide continuity of midwifery carer, an integrated approach to supportive family services and a community-based hub.

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    • 11 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ 2019 – Highly Commended Early Career Researcher Paper – Khic-Houy Prang

    Khi-Houy Prang an early career researcher from the Centre for Health Policy, Melbourne was highly commended for his paper “The use of public performance reporting by general practitioners: a study of perceptions and referral behaviours”. The study examined the use of PPR of hospital data by GPs when referring patients to hospitals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 GPs, recruited via the Victorian Primary Care Practice-Based Research Network and GP teaching practices in Victoria, Australia. The findings suggest that lack of PPR awareness prevented GPs from using it in their referral practice. As gatekeepers to secondary care, GPs are in a position to guide patients in their treatment decisions and referrals using available PPR data. The study suggests that there needs to be greater involvement by GPs in the development of hospital performance and quality indicators in Australia if GPs are to make greater use of them.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ endorses the Uluru Statement from the Heart

    At our 2019 Annual General Meeting in Auckland Health Services Research Association of Austrlia and New Zealand member Dr Kim O’Donnell, who is a Malyankapa/Barkindji woman, mother and public health researcher read and explained the importance of the Uluru Statement from the Heart and it’s call for a First Nations Voice enshrined in the constitution. The Statement was endorsed by the Association.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ Awards 2019 – Best Overall Paper– Highly Commended – Katherine Harding

    Katherine Harding’s highly commended paper “A model of access combining triage with initial management reduced waiting time for community outpatient services: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial”.was published in BMC Med. It demonstrates that waiting times for community and outpatient services are not inevitable. Improvements in access can be achieved by addressing service inefficiencies and encouraging service providers to make priority decisions about service delivery in response to demand.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ Awards 2019 – Winner Best Qualitative Paper – Kristie Weir

    Kristie’s paper “Decision-Making Preferences and Deprescribing: Perspectives of Older Adults and Companions about their Medicines” was published in the Journal of Gerontology. It found that there are new ways to characterise older people who take multiple medicines and those who are open to “deprescribing”. The study provides a novel way to describe differences between older people who are happy to take multiple medicines and those who are open to deprescribing.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ 2019 Awards – Best Paper by an Early Career Researcher – Highly Commended, Andrea Schaffer

    Andrea Schaffer an early career researcher from the Centre for Big Data in Health, UNSW was highly commended for her paper ‘”Trajectories of antipsychotic use before and during pregnancy, and associated maternal and birth characteristics” published in Aust N Z J Psychiatry. The paper described a study of antipsychotic use in a cohort of 137,993 women from the Maternal Use of Medications and Safety (MUMS) study who gave birth in New South Wales, and characterised them according to their mental health characteristics and birth outcomes using linked administrative health data (perinatal data, medicine claims data, hospital admissions, and death registry data). Women using antipsychotic medicines around pregnancy were heterogeneous, with varying mental health needs and complexity of treatment, and high rates of risk factors such as smoking and substance use disorder. It is therefore important that clinical guidance about use of antipsychotics in pregnancy be tailored to a woman’s individual circumstances as much as possible.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ 2019 Awards – Best Paper by an Early Career Researcher – Winner, Sopany Saing

    Sopany Saing and researchers from the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation at the University of Technology Sydney used real-world data to provide the first ex-post evaluation study of the cost effectiveness of mandatory folic acid fortification of bread-making flour in Australia. Equity in outcomes were demonstrated by larger reductions in the neural tube defect rate in babies of teenage mothers and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers, both sub-groups who had the highest rates of neural tube defects prior to the introduction of the mandatory policy.

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    • 10 DEC 19
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    HSRAANZ 2019 Awards – Highly Commended PhD Paper – Michelle Tew

    Michelle’s paper “Incorporating Future Medical Costs: Impact on Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Cancer Patients” was published in Pharmacoeconomics. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the impact of incorporating future medical costs through an applied example using original data from a clinical study evaluating the cost-effectiveness of a sepsis intervention in cancer patients. The study was able to demonstrate the practicability of including future medical costs using publicly available data and the importance of capturing existing heterogeneity between cancer types which can give rise to different cost-effectiveness results. This provides important input into treatment, planning and policy decisions.

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