• 13 DEC 16

    Health and Self

    When women receive a breast cancer diagnosis they face choices not only about their immediate treatment but also about how to manage the risk of recurrence. For a growing number of women that involves surgery to remove a healthy breast. This study by Richard De Abreu Lourenco, of the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE) at UTS, which was nominated for the HSRAANZ Best PhD Prize, seeks to understand what factors influence this choice.

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    • 06 DEC 16

    Congratulations to our 2016 HSRAANZ Award Winners

    The best and most impactful health services research has been celebrated at the HSRAANZ Symposium and AGM in Canberra on 1 December. Leading researchers and policy makers gathered at the National Press Club to consider the future direction of health services research and heard from leading health services researchers about how their work is having real world impact. At the end of the event awards were made in the categories of Best Impact Project, Best Paper and Best PhD Student.

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    • 06 DEC 16

    New HSRAANZ Executive Committee

    Read about the Association’s new Executive Committtee announced at our AGM on 1 December 2016. And let our Executive Officer, Sarah Green know if you would like to get more actively involved with the work of the Association.

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    • 05 DEC 16
    Screening for important unwarranted variation in clinical practice: a triple-test of processes of care, costs and patient outcomes

    Screening for important unwarranted variation in clinical practice: a triple-test of processes of care, costs and patient outcomes

    Andrew Partington from the School of Public Health, University of Adelaide talks about his paper which won the HSRAANZ Best Quantitative Paper Award .

    Quality improvement initiatives in healthcare are not trivial pursuits. They require resources and engagement with clinicians and front line staff. Policy levers are needed to prioritise initiatives with the greatest ‘bang for buck’ to reduce the risk of seemingly ‘inefficient policy’ being scrapped.

    Andrew’s paper presents a case study of a practicable approach to using routinely collected data to compare risk-adjusted costs, outcomes and processes across providers and patient sub-groups. Such analyses improve on the use of singular, non-adjusted measures of performance to identify priority areas for non-trivial investments in time and financial resources to improve service quality.

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